Technology

Mountain Bike Film Workshop…

 

A short trailer for my upcoming mountain bike film workshop. Within these 7 days, I will share everything I know about making outdoor and mountain bike films. More details and bookings at inspiredmountainbikeadventures.com/filmmaking-workshop.html

Please leave a comment, if you have questions about this event, I’ll be happy to answer!

27th July to 03rd August 2013 near Sion, Switzerland

Categories: Adverts, Adverts / Commercials, Filme von Draussen, hardware, Mountain Biking, Movies, Music, Online Viewing, Photography, Technology, TV, Video, Vimeo | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Electric Land Rover Defender On The Way…

Land Rover EV prototype treads lightly uphill, recharges on the way down

Instant torque feels delicious on the highway, but it could be an even bigger asset in an offroader. Land Rover has been experimenting with electric versions of its Defender 110 for a while now, and claims its latest prototypes benefit from a reduction in wheel spin due to the single-speed motor, making them more adept at climbing and less likely to churn up the environment. The prototypes don’t necessarily stand out in terms of raw specs: they’re 25 percent heavier than turbodiesel models, with lower horsepower and torque ratings, and with a range of just 50 miles. They try to make up for it in other ways, however, with the ability to deliver up to eight hours of slow, grueling off-road time, where range is secondary to staying upright, and by exploiting Land Rover’s Hill Descent Control feature for faster recharging through regenerative breaking. There’s no plan to bring an EV Defender to market any time soon, or to run the Dakar gauntlet like some rivals have, but the prototypes are due to make appearance at the Geneva Motor Show before being tested for painful-sounding “specialist applications” later in the year.

LAND ROVER UNVEILS NEW ELECTRIC DEFENDER RESEARCH VEHICLE AT GENEVA MOTOR SHOW

– Land Rover continues to champion innovation in sustainable engineering with electric Defender research vehicle
– Engineered to deliver zero emissions whilst retaining legendary all-terrain capability
– Innovative powertrain combines a 70kw electric motor with lithium-ion battery pack

Whitley, UK, February 28, 2013 – Land Rover is continuing to champion British innovation and cutting-edge automotive engineering by unveiling seven new electric Defender models at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show. The research vehicle delivers zero emissions whilst retaining its tough, go-anywhere capability.

“Investing in innovation has always been the lifeblood of our business and our engineering teams are working hard to develop innovative new technology to provide sustainable motoring solutions,” said John Edwards, Land Rover Global Brand Director.

The standard diesel engine and gearbox in the 110 Defenders have been replaced by a 70kW (94bhp), 330Nm electric motor twinned with a 300-volt, lithium-ion battery with a capacity of 27kWh, giving a range of more than 50 miles. In typical, low speed off-road use it can last for up to eight hours before recharging. The battery can be fully charged by a 7kW fast charger in four hours, or a portable 3kW charger in 10 hours.

The electric vehicles (EVs) retain the Defender’s legendary four-wheel drive system and differential lock. Because the electric motor delivers maximum torque from the moment it starts, there’s no need for gear shifting and the transmission comprises a single speed, 2.7:1 reduction gearbox combined with the existing Defender four-wheel drive system. A modified version of Land Rover’s Terrain Response®System has also been incorporated.

The vehicles were developed by Land Rover’s Advanced Engineering Team following successful trials of the Defender-based electric vehicle, Leopard 1. The vehicles’ capability has been tested in extreme and environmentally sensitive conditions, demonstrating capabilities not shared by conventional road-going EVs. Trials included pulling a 12-tonne ‘road train’ up a 13 percent gradient and wading to a depth of 800mm.

In keeping with Land Rover’s ‘Tread Lightly’ philosophy the smooth, low-speed capability of the electric drivetrain makes the electric Defenders especially well suited to climbing obstacles without damaging the ground unnecessarily.

The battery weighs 410kg and is mounted in the front of the Defender in place of the diesel engine. Kerb weight is 100kg more than a basic Defender 110 and ranges from 2055kg to 2162kg depending whether the body style is a pick-up, hard top or station wagon.

All the major components in the electric powertrain – including the battery, inverter and motor – are air-cooled rather than liquid cooled, saving a considerable amount of weight and complexity and adding robustness. Regenerative braking has been optimised to such an extent that using Hill Descent Control, the motor can generate 30kW of electricity. Because the battery technology can be charged very quickly at a rate of up to twice its capacity of 54kW without reducing battery life, almost all of the regenerated energy can be recovered and stored. Up to 80 percent of the kinetic energy in the vehicle can be recovered in this way, depending on conditions.

“This project is acting as a rolling laboratory for Land Rover to assess electric vehicles, even in the most arduous all-terrain conditions. It gives us a chance to evolve and test some of the technologies that may one day be introduced into future Land Rover models,” said Antony Harper, Jaguar Land Rover Head of Research.

Although there are no plans for the all-terrain electric Defender to enter series production, the seven EVs will go into service in specialist real world trials later this year.

Read original article here

Categories: Backcountry, Components & Hardware, Design, Environment, Europe, hardware, Technology | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

No More Unedited GoPro Films Please…

 

Take some pride in your work.  Like this awesome edit that shows what’s possible with these amazing little sports cams…

 

Salomon Freeski TV S6E11 – Not another GoPro edit

 

Published on 26 Feb 2013

A new GoPro edit is uploaded to the internet every 3.57 seconds, but trust us when we tell you, this is not just another GoPro edit. Featuring the skiing of: Mark Abma, Kaj Zackrisson, Cody Townsend, Chris Rubens, Alexi Godbout, Mike Douglas, Tommy Ellingson, AJ Kemppainen, Vincent Gagnier, and more.

Music:
‘Forgotten’
by
Mattafix
Written by Marlon Roudette & Preetesh Hirji
Courtesy of Ol Media

Like us: http://facebook.com/salomonfreeski/
Follow us: http://twitter.com/salomonfreeski/
We’re also on Instagram: http://instagram.com/salomonfreeski
Listen FSTV S6: http://open.spotify.com/user/salomonf…

Categories: Backcountry, Components & Hardware, Freeride, Freestyle, GoPro, hardware, Internet, Jumps & Tricks, Movies, Music, Off-Piste, Online Viewing, Skiing, Snow, Technology, Video, Winter Sports, Youtube | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Unshackle Yourself From iTunes…

THERE is another way….

If you haven’t already got a Google account…first of all, why not?…second , get one, now! – I’m sure you know what website to go to to get one 😉

Google Play Music & Google Music Manager lets you upload up to 20,000 tracks – that’s twenty thousand tracks – to Google’s servers and then lets you listen to all your music from any device that’s logged into your Google Account….for FREE, from anywhere!

Google Play Music

Once you install the app on your computer, it will scan your iTunes folder or whatever folder you keep your music in and upload it all to the big G’s servers…if you’ve got a big music collection, that can obviously take a while but it all goes on it the background with a little icon telling you how many tracks it’s uploaded so far.

The clever bit is, that if it finds tracks in your music collection that are already available on Google Play (Google’s music service), it wont bother uploading them – Google will just give you rights/access to play them from it’s servers as well as download them onto other devices you own (computers & Android phones & tablets)

So you now have a free multi-room, multi-city, multi-country audio system!  Not only that – you’ve basically turned any internet connected computer on the planet into your personal stereo, with all your music on it…what’s not to like? 🙂

Google Play Music UI

Google Play Music UI

In my opinion, the Google Play ‘My Music’ user interface is far nicer to look at and easier to navigate than iTunes is, was or ever will be – plus for something that’s a cloud-based web-app it’s surprisingly quick, in fact except for a slight delay from when you hit Play to when the music starts, it seems to be faster to get around than the sluggish, bloated Apple software.

Give it a try, you wont be disappointed…

Categories: Components & Hardware, Design, hardware, Internet, Music, Technology | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Not Riding But Falling…With Style…EDIT : 2HRS UNTIL LAUNCH!

The countdown has begun for Felix Baumgartner’s epic jump from the edge of space. Supported by a team of experts, Felix will ascend in a helium balloon to an altitude of 120,000 ft / 36,576 m where he will take a leap of faith into the unknown in an attempt to become the first person to break the speed of sound during freefall

Watch it LIVE at youtube.com/redbull andhttp://redbullstratos.com !!

Felix Baumgartner draws from his extensive BASE jumping and skydiving history to prepare himself for the Final Mission. He relives the challenges he has already successfully accomplished and reveals the philosophy that drives him to push himself further and higher.

https://twitter.com/#!/RedBullStratos
https://www.facebook.com/redbullstratos

Click here to watch the Red Bull Stratos CGI Clip:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VCqnQq86fkY

Watch Felix’s first successful Test Jump here:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-TCO2IdoTA

Categories: Components & Hardware, Environment, Events / Races, hardware, Internet, Interview, Jumps & Tricks, Movies, Music, Online Viewing, Other Sports, Red Bull, Streaming, Technology, TV, Video, weather | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New Rubber…

Continental Black ‘Chili Compound’ 2.2″ MTB Tyres

Time for a set of new tyres for the Rockhopper.  Even though they had last season off and hardly saw any riding at all during 2009/2010 the 6yr old Specialized Resolution’s that were on the bike were literally falling to pieces, the rear one was nearly bald with a torn sidewall and the front wasn’t much better…

…in step the Germans.  Continental’s Black Chili Compound Rubber Queen – not sure about the name  :-/   & Mountain King II tyres as a front and rear set up for some time so I eventually pulled the trigger.

Continental Rubber Queen 2.2″ Black Chilli & Mountain King II 2.2″ Protection 2.2″ Black Chilli

These tyres retail for between £40-£50 each in the UK so was very happy to get them from the German online store Bike-Discount for €35 (£28) per tyre.  They went on the Stan’s Arch EX extremely easily – tyre levers not required.  And they make a satisfying loud pop! when you inflate them as they get seated in the rim.

  

I went for the Protection version of the Mountain King II for the rear to try reduce pinch flats and ward off some of the nastier, razor sharp Alpine rocks that seem to be common over here.  Never sure what pressure to go for when fitting a new tyre.  The side walls have no minimum but max. pressures of 65 psi.  I started with 31 psi in the front and 35 psi in the rear and took them for a killer of a ride.  It starts with a very steep climb up rough, rocky fire roads til you get to 1,757m alt. (that’s 500m alt. gain in 6km of trail…steep enough)…

Les Eduits 1,757m alt.

…followed by a very fast decent that drops you probably over 150m in about 1km of trail.  Then it’s into the forest for some pretty techy, steep & narrow singletrack with streams to cross and even the odd patch of mud to deal with.  Then a hike with bike up a steep and sketchy track next to the Casse du Boeuf chair lift before more forested single track and eventually you break the forest and get to the highest part of the ride for the second time of 1,750m and then an awesome. extremely fast & rocky descent into Villeneuve and more single track through woods & fields all the way home..

…So basically the tyres got a bit of everything

German engineering…there was never a doubt in my mind

In a word…these tyres are Awesome!  Fast rolling on the hard stuff yet super sticky for big, fast turns and plenty of grip when climbing steep, loose trails.  Also tight, fast Alpine switch backs are no problem either and the rare mud patch they encountered was dealt with easily too and they didn’t bring the wet stuff with them they left it on the trail where it should be, not clogging up the tread.

But the main thing I noticed with this setup compared to the Spesh Resolutions (and Schwalbe tyres I’ve tried);  with the Resolutions you could push them pretty hard but then they would just let go, with no warning and that generally results in cuts, bruises and even the odd trip over the bars.  When you push these tyres a little to hard (or in my case, just using bad technique) they give you a warning that they’re about to wash out and you have time to adjust and this one thing i.e  knowing your front wheel isn’t suddenly gonna go from under you improves your confidence a hell of a lot on the trail.

Rockhopper with new rubber

It’s all about the Black Chili, baby! 😎

Categories: All Mountain, Components & Hardware, Enduro, hardware, Mountain Biking, Mountains, Photography, Reviews, Serre Chevalier, Single Track, Technology, XC Mountain Biking | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mountain Poison…

Ski Wax: Extra Speed Could Carry More than Just a Steep Price Tag

Fluorinated ski waxes give competitors an extra edge. But these waxes contain and release chemicals that do not degrade in the environment and have been found in people, fish and wildlife around the world.

By Brendon Bosworth, 2-14-11

The difference: The left ski is treated with basic hydrocarbon wax, while the right one has a high fluorinated wax that makes the water bead up. But what else is it doing to people, the snowpack and, ultimately, water supplies?
The difference: The left ski is treated with basic hydrocarbon wax, while the right one has a high fluorinated wax that makes the water bead up. But what else is it doing to people, the snowpack and, ultimately, water supplies?

 

All ski waxes are not created equal. Seasoned competitors know it’s unlikely a standard block of wax will suffice when it comes to reaching the velocity needed to win professional events. Fluorinated waxes, which come as blocks or powders, help speed demons get their fixes. But the synthetic compounds that give these products their water-repellant qualities remain under investigation for their potential health effects.

Like many nonstick pans, “fluoro” waxes contain perfluorocarbons or PFCs. To help shave more seconds off the clock, some have Teflon mixed in. Some of the chemicals in the PFC family, such as PFOA(perfluorooctanoic acid), which is used to manufacture Teflon and Gore-Tex, are practically immortal. PFOA does not biodegrade. Instead, it endures in the environment and has been found in fish, birds, wildlife and people around the world, even in Arctic polar bears.

People are most likely exposed to PFCs through drinking tainted water, eating contaminated food or using PFC-containing products, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In a study on more than 2,000 participants, the CDC found PFCs in nearly all those tested.

Research into the possible human health effects of PFOA exposure is ongoing. But tests on lab animals have linked exposure to high levels of PFCs with changes in hormone levels, liver damage, cancer and birth defects.

“Studies of exposure to PFOA and adverse health outcomes in humans are inconclusive at present,” according to the Environmental Protection Agency. However, after reviewing the EPA’s 2005 draft assessment of the human health effects of PFOA, 75 percent of the organization’s Science Advisory Board felt it should be labeled as “likely to be carcinogenic to humans.”

Even though the impacts of the compound are still being evaluated, the EPA has introduced a PFOA Stewardship Program, aimed at eliminating industry emissions of PFOA and its precursor chemicals by 2015.

European Studies Focus on Professional Ski Wax Technicians

Last year, two European studies highlighted that PFCs build up within professional ski wax technicians who spend their workdays prepping skis for national competitors. Operating in close quarters, often with inadequate ventilation, the technicians inhaled fumes released when melting waxes with hot irons, as well as tiny particles of wax dust.

Norwegian study assessed 13 technicians working the 2008 and 2009 World Cup seasons. The researchers found they had roughly 10 to 40 times higher median concentrations of certain perfluorochemicals, also found in the workroom air, in their serum than the general population. PFOA was found at the highest concentrations: 25 times above regular background levels.

Dr. Baard Freberg, based at Norway’s National Institute of Occupational Health and team medical doctor for Norway’s national biathlon teams, was lead author of this study.

He began a pilot study in 2006 after waxers complained about asthma-like symptoms, itching skin, eye irritation, fever, headaches and vomiting, even though they’d started using full-face respirators as he’d instructed in 2001. “The waxers had become suspicious about some new powders [they were using],” he said via email.

Swedish study focused on eight technicians from the U.S. and Swedish national cross-country teams. The results suggest that technicians could be producing PFOA in their blood, after breathing in a fluorotelomer alcohol (8:2 FTOH). The alcohol is released during the waxing process and was found in concentrations up to 800 times higher that PFOA in air samples taken from waxing cabins. 8:2 FTOH is a known as a “precursor compound” since it can break down to form PFOA. This transformation has been shown to occur in rats.

In their previous study the researchers found higher PFC levels in technicians who’d been in the business for longer than newer recruits.

Should Self-Waxers be Concerned?

The technicians in the Swedish study spent 30 hours a week melting, spreading and scraping fluorinated wax in cloistered conditions. The average skier or snowboarder, tuning their equipment every few weeks before a weekend session, comes nowhere near that type of exposure. But fluoro waxes should still be handled with care.

“We have maintained for years now that people who work with perfluorocarbons should wear a mask and it is not a bad idea to use a mask when hot waxing in general if the room is not well ventilated,” said Ian Harvey, brand manager for Toko wax company, via email. “I recommend a full face mask as they are more comfortable and also keep the eyes clean of dust from waxing.”

On its website, Swix, a large international producer of ski wax,emphasizes that fluorocarbon waxes can release poisonous gases if heated above 570 degrees and should not be exposed to open flames.

Freberg recommends using respirators, even if not dealing with fluorinated waxes, to prevent inhalation of nano sized particles of wax dust. He also advises against eating and smoking inside waxing areas.

Natural Alternatives

Most standard waxes are made from petroleum or paraffin, byproducts of crude oil. Some incorporate other “slip agents” besides PFCs, such as graphite, molybdenum and silicone. On every run down the slopes, bits of wax flake off skis and snowboards, building up in the snowpack, eventually working their way into runoff when snow melts.

“A lot of people say, well, it’s just a little bit, it’s not that much, but over the years it can build up,” says Greg Barker, CEO of Nevada-based Enviro Mountain Sports, which makes natural waxes.

The U.S. ski industry recorded close to 60 million visits over the 2009-2010 season. Barker estimates that each skier or boarder deposits about three-quarters of an ounce of wax during a typical visit. That amounts to potentially 2.8 million pounds of wax entering mountain snow across the country each year, using these figures.

“Think about the snow under the lift line: Reach down there and take a cup of that snow and melt it – do you want to drink that?” he says.

Scott Sparks, owner of Colorado-based Purl Wax, which produces a natural wax, Ice 9, does not deny that fluoro waxes are incredibly fast when properly matched to the snow conditions. But, like Barker, he’s concerned about their long-lived compounds entering water streams.

“While an argument could be made that fluoro based waxes are a necessary evil for the ski racing world, the large majority of wax is used on rental fleets. There is absolutely no reason to use fluorinated waxes on rental fleets,” Sparks said in an email.

According to Sparks, Ice 9 contains none of the ingredients found in traditional wax. It is made from natural compounds that have similar ultra-hydrophobic (water repellant) properties to the synthetic ones found in fluoro waxes. These are nontoxic, biodegradable and renewable, he said.

Enviro Mountain Sports uses hydrogenated plant and vegetable oils to make their wax. They initially used soy as a base ingredient, but this did not work well across a broad enough temperature range, Barker explains.

Likewise, Purl does not use soy oil because it is not durable enough, said Sparks.

Barker is so confident in the harmlessness of his company’s wax that he says he’d eat a bite of it. He has fried an egg in melted oil from the wax and eaten it, he says.

 

Original Article;

http://www.newwest.net/snow_blog/article/ski_wax_extra_speed_could_carry_more_than_just_a_steep_price_tag/C458/L41/

 

Categories: article, Food, Mountains, Skiing, Snowboarding, Technology, Winter Sports | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

No More Cold Hands…

…When using the phone up the mountains.  Found these ‘Touch Gloves’ for €5.  I tried some Nike (I think) ones on in Footlocker in Grenoble a couple of weeks back which were €15.

Hopefully cam-phone photos should be better, messages should have less spelling mistakes & I’ll stop dialling incorrect numbers, as my fingers wont be numb!

        

Categories: clothing, Technology, weather | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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